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Technology FAQ’s

    Application Security

  • BitLocker is an operating system-level extension to Vista that combines on-disk encryption and special key management techniques. The data and the operating system installation are both protected by two-factor authentication, specifically, a hardware key used in conjunction with a long passphrase.

  • An application firewall is an enhanced firewall that limits access by applications to the operating system (OS) of a computer. Conventional firewalls merely control the flow of data to and from the central processing unit (CPU), examining each packet and determining whether or not to forward it toward a particular destination. An application firewall offers additional protection by controlling the execution of files or the handling of data by specific applications.

  • Polymorphic malware is harmful, destructive or intrusive computer software such as a virus, worm, Trojan or spyware that constantly changes ("morphs"), making it difficult to detect with anti-malware programs. Evolution of the malicious code can occur in a variety of ways such as filename changes, compression and encryption with variable keys.

  • SSI injection is a form of attack that can be used to compromise Web sites that contain SSI (server-side include) statements. An SSI is a variable value such as a "Last modified" date that a server can place in an HTML file. Before sending the file to the requestor, the server searches the file for CGI (common gateway interface) environment variables and inserts the appropriate values in the places where "include" statements appear. In SSI injection, the variable values are modified by an external hacker. This can allow the hacker to add, alter or delete HTML files on the server. It can also make it possible for the hacker to gain access to server resources.

  • Mutual authentication, also called two-way authentication, is a process or technology in which both entities in a communications link authenticate each other. In a network environment, the client authenticates the server and vice-versa. In this way, network users can be assured that they are doing business exclusively with legitimate entities and servers can be certain that all would-be users are attempting to gain access for legitimate purposes. Mutual authentication is gaining acceptance as a tool that can minimize the risk of online fraud in e-commerce.

  • Backup / Recovery

  • A disaster recovery plan (DRP) - sometimes referred to as a business continuity plan (BCP) or business process contingency plan (BPCP) - describes how an organization is to deal with potential disasters. Just as a disaster is an event that makes the continuation of normal functions impossible, a disaster recovery plan consists of the precautions taken so that the effects of a disaster will be minimized and the organization will be able to either maintain or quickly resume mission-critical functions. Typically, disaster recovery planning involves an analysis of business processes and continuity needs; it may also include a significant focus on disaster prevention.

  • Continuous data protection (CDP), also called continuous backup, is a storage system in which all the data in an enterprise is backed up whenever any change is made. In effect, CDP creates an electronic journal of complete storage snapshots, one storage snapshot for every instant in time that data modification occurs.

  • Delta differencing (also called "delta differential") is a backup technique used to make the process more efficient. The process involves examining a backup file set and locating the blocks or bytes that have changed since the last backup period. Changed data, rather than the entire file set, can then be sent to the backup target locally across the LAN (local area network) or to a virtual tape library (VTL) or other remote storage across the WAN (wide area network).

  • Disk-to-disk-to-tape (D2D2T) is an approach to computer storage backup and archiving in which data is initially copied to backup storage on a disk storage system and then periodically copied again to a tape storage system (or possibly to an optical storage system). Traditionally, many businesses have done backup directly to relatively inexpensive tape systems. However, for many computer applications, it's important to have data immediately ready to be restored from a secondary disk if and when the data on the primary disk becomes inaccessible (for example, if the server fails). The time to restore data from tape would be considered unacceptable. On the other hand, tape is a more economical alternative for long-term storage (archiving). Because it's also more portable, tape is often used for off-site backup and restoration in case of a disaster.

  • A storage area network (SAN) is a high-speed special-purpose network (or subnetwork) that interconnects different kinds of data storage devices with associated data servers on behalf of a larger network of users. Typically, a storage area network is part of the overall network of computing resources for an enterprise. A storage area network is usually clustered in close proximity to other computing resources such as IBM z990 mainframes but may also extend to remote locations for backup and archival storage, using wide area network carrier technologies such as ATM or SONET.

  • System Restore is a Windows utility that allows a user to restore their computer data to a specific former state (known as a restore point), undoing changes made since that time. The user's personal data saved since that time (such as new files, new e-mail messages, and changes to documents) remains intact, but system changes are undone. System Restore periodically creates automatic restore points, called "system checkpoints" that protect data from unexpected problems. The utility also allows the user to create manual restore points before making any significant changes to the system, such as installing new programs or making changes to the registry.

  • Connectivity speeds and the amount of data being backed up will determine if a server at a remote location can be backed up. During the initial customer needs interview this information will be discovered and feasibility of data backup will be determined.

  • The amount of data to be backed up and the required time to perform the backup will determine whether to use the SAN (Fibre Channel Card) or Network (Network Interface Card) for Backup.

  • Email and Messaging

  • A Bayesian filter is a program that uses Bayesian logic , also called Bayesian analysis, to evaluate the header and content of an incoming e-mail message and determine the probability that it constitutes spam . Bayesian logic is an extension of the work of the 18th-century English mathematician Thomas Bayes.

  • A blackhole list, sometimes simply referred to as a blacklist, is the publication of a group of ISP addresses known to be sources of spam, a type of e-mail more formally known as unsolicited commercial e-mail (UCE). The goal of a blackhole list is to provide a list of IP addresses that a network can use to filter out undesireable traffic. After filtering, traffic coming or going to an IP address on the list simply disappears, as if it were swallowed by an astronomical black hole. The Mail Abuse Prevention System (MAPS) Real-time Blackhole List (RBL), which has over 3000 entries, is one of the most popular blackhole lists. Begun as a personal project by Paul Vixie, it used by hundreds of servers around the world. Other popular blackhole lists include the Relay Spam Stopper and the Dialup User List.

  • Bluesnarfing is the theft of information from a wireless device through a Bluetooth connection.

  • In programs used to filter spam, a false positive is a legitimate message mistakenly marked as spam. Messages that are determined to be spam may be rejected by a server or client-side spam filter program and returned to the sender as bounce e-mail .
    One problem with many filtering tools is that if they are configured stringently enough to be effective, there's a fairly high chance of getting false positives. The risk of accidentally blocking an important message has been enough to deter many companies from implementing any anti-spam measures at all.

  • A botnet (also known as a zombie army) is a number of Internet computers that, although their owners are unaware of it, have been set up to forward transmissions (including spam or viruses) to other computers on the Internet. Any such computer is referred to as a zombie - in effect, a computer "robot" or "bot" that serves the wishes of some master spam or virus originator. Most computers compromised in this way are home-based. According to a report from Russian-based Kaspersky Labs, botnets -- not spam, viruses, or worms -- currently pose the biggest threat to the Internet. A report from Symantec came to a similar conclusion.

  • DomainKeys is an anti-spam software application in development at Yahoo that uses a form of public key cryptography to authenticate the sender's domain. Today, the sender of a spam message can spoof the originating address so that recipients will think it came from someone else and thus open it as legitimate mail. Yahoo's software would enable the receiving end of e-mail to easily filter out notes in which the sender's stated address could not be authenticated as the actual address. Yahoo plans to make its software freely available to open-source developers, hoping that it will be adopted, installed, and implemented throughout the Internet.

  • An open relay (sometimes called an insecure relay or a third-party relay) is an SMTP e-mail server that allows third-party relay of e-mail messages. By processing mail that is neither for nor from a local user, an open relay makes it possible for an unscrupulous sender to route large volumes of spam. In effect, the owner of the server -- who is typically unaware of the problem -- donates network and computer resources to the sender's purpose. In addition to the financial costs incurred when a spammer hijacks a server, an organization may also suffer system crashes, equipment damage, and loss of business.

  • Network Security

  • A zero-day exploit is one that takes advantage of a security vulnerability on the same day that the vulnerability becomes generally known. Ordinarily, after someone detects that a software program contains a potential exposure to exploitation by a hacker, that person or company can notify the software company and sometimes the world at large so that action can be taken to repair the exposure or defend against its exploitation. Given time, the software company can repair and distribute a fix to users. Even if potential hackers also learn of the vulnerability, it may take them some time to exploit it; meanwhile, the fix can hopefully become available first.

  • Asymmetric cryptography or public-key cryptography is cryptography in which a pair of keys is used to encrypt and decrypt a message so that it arrives securely. Initially, a network user receives a public and private key pair from a certificate authority. Any other user who wants to send an encrypted message can get the intended recipient's public key from a public directory. They use this key to encrypt the message, and they send it to the recipient. When the recipient gets the message, they decrypt it with their private key, which no one else should have access to.

  • Authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) is a term for a framework for intelligently controlling access to computer resources, enforcing policies, auditing usage, and providing the information necessary to bill for services. These combined processes are considered important for effective network management and security.

  • A back door is a means of access to a computer program that bypasses security mechanisms. A programmer may sometimes install a back door so that the program can be accessed for troubleshooting or other purposes. However, attackers often use back doors that they detect or install themselves, as part of an exploit. In some cases, a worm is designed to take advantage of a back door created by an earlier attack. For example, Nimda gained entrance through a back door left by Code Red

  • On the Internet, a bastion host is the only host computer that a company allows to be addressed directly from the public network and that is designed to screen the rest of its network from security exposure.

  • A blended threat is a computer network attack that seeks to maximize the severity of damage and speed of contagion by combining methods, for example using characteristics of both viruses and worms, while also taking advantage of vulnerabilities in computers, networks, or other physical systems. An attack using a blended approach might send a virus via an e-mail attachment, along with a Trojan horse embedded in an HTML file that will cause damage to the recipient computer. The Nimda, CodeRed, and Bugbear exploits were all examples of blended threats

  • Brute force (also known as brute force cracking) is a trial and error method used by application programs to decode encrypted data such as passwords or Data Encryption Standard (DES) keys, through exhaustive effort (using brute force) rather than employing intellectual strategies. Just as a criminal might break into, or "crack" a safe by trying many possible combinations, a brute force cracking application proceeds through all possible combinations of legal characters in sequence. Brute force is considered to be an infallible, although time-consuming, approach.

  • A buffer overflow occurs when a program or process tries to store more data in a buffer (temporary data storage area) than it was intended to hold. Since buffers are created to contain a finite amount of data, the extra information - which has to go somewhere - can overflow into adjacent buffers, corrupting or overwriting the valid data held in them. Although it may occur accidentally through programming error, buffer overflow is an increasingly common type of security attack on data integrity. In buffer overflow attacks, the extra data may contain codes designed to trigger specific actions, in effect sending new instructions to the attacked computer that could, for example, damage the user's files, change data, or disclose confidential information. Buffer overflow attacks are said to have arisen because the C programming language supplied the framework, and poor programming practices supplied the vulnerability.

  • Cryptography is the science of information security. The word is derived from the Greek kryptos, meaning hidden. Cryptography is closely related to the disciplines of cryptology and cryptanalysis. Cryptography includes techniques such as microdots, merging words with images, and other ways to hide information in storage or transit. However, in today's computer-centric world, cryptography is most often associated with scrambling plaintext (ordinary text, sometimes referred to as cleartext) into ciphertext (a process called encryption), then back again (known as decryption). Individuals who practice this field are known as cryptographers.

  • What is Data Encryption Standard (DES) ?

  • A denial of service (DoS) attack is an incident in which a user or organization is deprived of the services of a resource they would normally expect to have. In a distributed denial-of-service(DDOS), large numbers of compromised systems (sometimes called a botnet) attack a single target.

  • All three terms - decipher, decrypt, and decode - mean to convert ciphertext into the original, unencrypted plaintext. Decrypt is actually a generic term, covering both the other terms, that simply means to unscramble a message. The root prefix crypto is from the Greek kryptos, meaning hidden or secret.

  • A dictionary attack is a method of breaking into a password-protected computer or server by systematically entering every word in a dictionary as a password. A dictionary attack can also be used in an attempt to find the key necessary to decrypt an encrypted message or document.

  • In computer networks, a DMZ (demilitarized zone) is a computer host or small network inserted as a "neutral zone" between a company's private network and the outside public network. It prevents outside users from getting direct access to a server that has company data. (The term comes from the geographic buffer zone that was set up between North Korea and South Korea following the UN "police action" in the early 1950s.) A DMZ is an optional and more secure approach to a firewall and effectively acts as a proxy server as well.

  • A digital certificate is an electronic "credit card" that establishes your credentials when doing business or other transactions on the Web. It is issued by a certification authority (CA). It contains your name, a serial number, expiration dates, a copy of the certificate holder's public key (used for encrypting messages and digital signatures), and the digital signature of the certificate-issuing authority so that a recipient can verify that the certificate is real. Some digital certificates conform to a standard, X.509. Digital certificates can be kept in registries so that authenticating users can look up other users' public keys.

  • A digital signature (not to be confused with a digital certificate) is an electronic signature that can be used to authenticate the identity of the sender of a message or the signer of a document, and possibly to ensure that the original content of the message or document that has been sent is unchanged. Digital signatures are easily transportable, cannot be imitated by someone else, and can be automatically time-stamped. The ability to ensure that the original signed message arrived means that the sender cannot easily repudiate it later.

  • Cache poisoning, also called domain name system (DNS) poisoning or DNS cache poisoning, is the corruption of an Internet server's domain name system table by replacing an Internet address with that of another, rogue address. When a Web user seeks the page with that address, the request is redirected by the rogue entry in the table to a different address. At that point, a worm, spyware, Web browser hijacking program, or other malware can be downloaded to the user's computer from the rogue location.

  • An ethical hacker is a computer and network expert who attacks a security system on behalf of its owners, seeking vulnerabilities that a malicious hacker could exploit. To test a security system, ethical hackers use the same methods as their less principled counterparts, but report problems instead of taking advantage of them. Ethical hacking is also known as penetration testing, intrusion testing, and red teaming. An ethical hacker is sometimes called a white hat, a term that comes from old Western movies, where the "good guy" wore a white hat and the "bad guy" wore a black hat.

  • False rejection, also called a type I error, is a mistake occasionally made by biometric security systems. In an instance of false rejection, the system fails to recognize an authorized person and rejects that person as an impostor.

  • Google hacking is the use of a search engine, such as Google, to locate a security vulnerability on the Internet. There are generally two types of vulnerabilities to be found on the Web: software vulnerabilities and misconfigurations. Although there are some sophisticated intruders who target a specific system and try to discover vulnerabilities that will allow them access, the vast majority of intruders start out with a specific software vulnerability or common user misconfiguration that they already know how to exploit, and simply try to find or scan for systems that have this vulnerability. Google is of limited use to the first attacker, but invaluable to the second.

  • Host intrusion detection systems (HIDS) and network intrusion detection systems (NIDS) are methods of security management for computers and networks. In HIDS, anti-threat applications such as firewalls, antivirus software and spyware-detection programs are installed on every network computer that has two-way access to the outside environment such as the Internet. In NIDS, anti-threat software is installed only at specific points such as servers that interface between the outside environment and the network segment to be protected.

  • A honey pot is a computer system on the Internet that is expressly set up to attract and "trap" people who attempt to penetrate other people's computer systems. (This includes the hacker, cracker, and script kiddy.)

  • In a computer program, a logic bomb, also called slag code, is programming code, inserted surreptitiously or intentionally, that is designed to execute (or "explode") under circumstances such as the lapse of a certain amount of time or the failure of a a program user to respond to a program command. It is in effect a delayed-action computer virus or Trojan horse. A logic bomb, when "exploded," may be designed to display or print a spurious message, delete or corrupt data, or have other undesirable effects.

    What is a man in the middle attack?

    A man in the middle attack is one in which the attacker intercepts messages in a public key exchange and then retransmits them, substituting his own public key for the requested one, so that the two original parties still appear to be communicating with each other The attack gets its name from the ball game where two people try to throw a ball directly to each other while one person in between them attempts to catch it. In a man in the middle attack, the intruder uses a program that appears to be the server to the client and appears to be the client to the server. The attack may be used simply to gain access to the message, or enable the attacker to modify the message before retransmitting it.

  • Nonrepudiation is the assurance that someone cannot deny something. Typically, nonrepudiation refers to the ability to ensure that a party to a contract or a communication cannot deny the authenticity of their signature on a document or the sending of a message that they originated.

  • Pharming is a scamming practice in which malicious code is installed on a personal computer or server, misdirecting users to fraudulent Web sites without their knowledge or consent. Pharming has been called "phishing without a lure."

    What is a Phreak?

    A phreak is someone who breaks into the telephone network illegally, typically to make free long-distance phone calls or to tap phone lines. The term is now sometimes used to include anyone who breaks or tries to break the security of any network. Recently, the phone companies have introduced new security safeguards, making phreaking more difficult.

  • On the Internet, ping of death is a denial of service (DoS) attack caused by an attacker deliberately sending an IP packet larger than the 65,536 bytes allowed by the IP protocol. One of the features of TCP/IP is fragmentation; it allows a single IP packet to be broken down into smaller segments. In 1996, attackers began to take advantage of that feature when they found that a packet broken down into fragments could add up to more than the allowed 65,536 bytes. Many operating systems didn't know what to do when they received an oversized packet, so they froze, crashed, or rebooted.

  • A PKI (public key infrastructure) enables users of a basically unsecure public network such as the Internet to securely and privately exchange data and money through the use of a public and a private cryptographic key pair that is obtained and shared through a trusted authority. The public key infrastructure provides for a digital certificate that can identify an individual or an organization and directory services that can store and, when necessary, revoke the certificates. Although the components of a PKI are generally understood, a number of different vendor approaches and services are emerging. Meanwhile, an Internet standard for PKI is being worked on.

  • Tunneling, also known as "port forwarding," is the transmission of data intended for use only within a private, usually corporate network through a public network in such a way that the routing nodes in the public network are unaware that the transmission is part of a private network. Tunneling is generally done by encapsulating the private network data and protocol information within the public network transmission units so that the private network protocol information appears to the public network as data. Tunneling allows the use of the Internet, which is a public network, to convey data on behalf of a private network.

  • A rootkit is a collection of tools (programs) that enable administrator-level access to a computer or computer network. Typically, a cracker installs a rootkit on a computer after first obtaining user-level access, either by exploiting a known vulnerability or cracking a password. Once the rootkit is installed, it allows the attacker to mask intrusion and gain root or privileged access to the computer and, possibly, other machines on the network.

  • A secret key algorithm (sometimes called a symmetric algorithm) is a cryptographic algorithm that uses the same key to encrypt and decrypt data. The best known algorithm is the U.S. Department of Defense's Data Encryption Standard (DES). DES, which was developed at IBM in 1977, was thought to be so difficult to break that the U.S. government restricted its exportation.

  • The Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) is a commonly-used protocol for managing the security of a message transmission on the Internet. SSL has recently been succeeded by Transport Layer Security (TLS), which is based on SSL. SSL uses a program layer located between the Internet's Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) and Transport Control Protocol (TCP) layers. SSL is included as part of both the Microsoft and Netscape browsers and most Web server products. Developed by Netscape, SSL also gained the support of Microsoft and other Internet client/server developers as well and became the de facto standard until evolving into Transport Layer Security. The "sockets" part of the term refers to the sockets method of passing data back and forth between a client and a server program in a network or between program layers in the same computer. SSL uses the public-and-private key encryption system from RSA, which also includes the use of a digital certificate.

  • A session key is an encryption and decryption key that is randomly generated to ensure the security of a communications session between a user and another computer or between two computers. Session keys are sometimes called symmetric keys, because the same key is used for both encryption and decryption. A session key may be derived from a hash value, using the CryptDeriveKey function (this method is called a session-key derivation scheme). Throughout each session, the key is transmitted along with each message and is encrypted with the recipient's public key. Because much of their security relies upon the brevity of their use, session keys are changed frequently. A different session key may be used for each message.

  • Session replay is a scheme an intruder uses to masquerade as an authorized user on an interactive Web site. By stealing the user's session ID, the intruder gains access and the ability to do anything the authorized user can do on the Web site.

  • Single sign-on (SSO)is a session/user authentication process that permits a user to enter one name and password in order to access multiple applications. The process authenticates the user for all the applications they have been given rights to and eliminates further prompts when they switch applications during a particular session.

  • A smurf attack is an exploitation of the Internet Protocol (IP) broadcast addressing to create a denial of service. The attacker uses a program called Smurf to cause the attacked part of a network to become inoperable. The exploit of smurfing, as it has come to be known, takes advantage of certain known characteristics of the Internet Protocol (IP) and the Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP). The ICMP is used by network nodes and their administrators to exchange information about the state of the network. ICMP can be used to ping other nodes to see if they are operational. An operational node returns an echo message in response to a ping message.

  • Steganography (pronounced STEHG-uh-NAH-gruhf-ee, from Greek steganos, or "covered," and graphie, or "writing") is the hiding of a secret message within an ordinary message and the extraction of it at its destination. Steganography takes cryptography a step farther by hiding an encrypted message so that no one suspects it exists. Ideally, anyone scanning your data will fail to know it contains encrypted data.

  • SYN flooding is a method that the user of a hostile client program can use to conduct a denial-of-service (DOS) attack on a computer server. The hostile client repeatedly sends SYN (synchronization) packets to every port on the server, using fake IP addresses.

  • In computers, a Trojan horse is a program in which malicious or harmful code is contained inside apparently harmless programming or data in such a way that it can get control and do its chosen form of damage, such as ruining the file allocation table on your hard disk. In one celebrated case, a Trojan horse was a program that was supposed to find and destroy computer viruses. A Trojan horse may be widely redistributed as part of a computer virus.

  • False acceptance, also called a type II error, is a mistake occasionally made by biometric security systems. In an instance of false acceptance, an unauthorized person is identified as an authorized person.

  • A virus hoax is a false warning about a computer virus. Typically, the warning arrives in an e-mail note or is distributed through a note in a company's internal network. These notes are usually forwarded using distribution lists and they will typically suggest that the recipient forward the note to other distribution lists.

  • Virtualization

  • Application virtualization (also known as application portability or application service virtualization) is the practice of running software from a remote server rather than on the user's computer. Dynamic link library (DLL) programs redirect all the virtualized application's calls to the server's file system. When software is run from the server in this manner, no changes are made to the local computer's operating system (OS), file system or registry. Computing resources are allocated based on changing requirements in real time.

  • A bare metal environment is a computer system or network in which a virtual machine is installed directly on hardware rather than within the host operating system (OS). The term "bare metal" refers to a hard disk, the usual medium on which a computer's OS is installed.

  • An embedded hypervisor is a hypervisor that is programmed (embedded) directly into a processor, personal computer (PC) or server. This architecture offers convenience at the cost of some flexibility compared with conventional hypervisors. However, for many users, the small footprint and integrated functionality of the embedded hypervisor more than make up for a potential lack of robustness.

  • File virtualization is the creation of an abstraction layer between file servers and the clients that access those file servers. Once deployed, the file virtualization layer manages files and file systems across servers, allowing administrators to present clients with one logical file mount for all servers. The file servers continue to host file data and metadata.

  • Hardware virtualization is when the virtual machine manager is embedded in the circuits of a hardware component instead of being called up from a third-party software application. The virtual machine manager is called a hypervisor.

    What is a hypervisor?

    A hypervisor, also called a virtual machine manager, is a program that allows multiple operating systems to share a single hardware host. Each operating system appears to have the host's processor, memory, and other resources all to itself. However, the hypervisor is actually controlling the host processor and resources, allocating what is needed to each operating system in turn and making sure that the guest operating systems (called virtual mahines) cannot disrupt each other.

  • Network virtualization is a method of combining the available resources in a network by splitting up the available bandwidth into channels, each of which is independent from the others, and each of which can be assigned (or reassigned) to a particular server or device in real time. Each channel is independently secured. Every subscriber has shared access to all the resources on the network from a single computer.

  • Virtualization is the pooling of physical storage from multiple network storage devices into what appears to be a single storage device that is managed from a central console. Storage virtualization is commonly used in a storage area network (SAN). The management of storage devices can be tedious and time-consuming. Storage virtualization helps the storage administrator perform the tasks of backup, archiving, and recovery more easily, and in less time, by disguising the actual complexity of the SAN.

  • Virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) is the practice of hosting a desktop operating system within a virtual machine (VM) running on a centralized server. VDI is a variation on the client/server computing model, sometimes referred to as server-based computing (SBC). The term was coined by VMware Inc. In the past couple of years, some large organizations have turned to VDI as an alternative to the server-based computing model used by Citrix and Microsoft Terminal Services.

  • Virtual (or logical) memory is a concept that, when implemented by a computer and its operating system, allows programmers to use a very large range of memory or storage addresses for stored data. The computing system maps the programmer's virtual addresses to real hardware storage addresses. Usually, the programmer is freed from having to be concerned about the availability of data storage.